Q
FYI to the person worried about sleep apnea, the belief that fat causes sleep apnea is based on the work of Roger Fogel. His work was found by the NIH to be falsified. Google to find the NIH scientific misconduct findings. By the time the research came to light, Fogel was working for Merck (big pharma). From what I have heard, they still teach Fogel's findings in med school, even after having been proven false. Can't have science getting in the way of fat prejudice. Still MYOB, but good to know.
A

FYI: That was one study, and there have been many, many, many others.

I mean shit, just google it


talkingape231:

paulwelsey:

tellthemwhoiwillbe:

While you wait for the waiter, 

in that moment

do you not become the waiter

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I hate this fucking website

(via birdowl)


thisisthinprivilege:

this is where thin privilege intersects with male privilege. this is where fat girls are reminded that no place is safe: that nerd culture, which is supposed to stand for acceptance of people who are intellectual and non-athletic and different, still employs the same double standards that the rest of the world does. men are allowed to be fat. women are not.

But… it says unisex. Like right there. Not “male”.

thisisthinprivilege:

this is where thin privilege intersects with male privilege. this is where fat girls are reminded that no place is safe: that nerd culture, which is supposed to stand for acceptance of people who are intellectual and non-athletic and different, still employs the same double standards that the rest of the world does. men are allowed to be fat. women are not.

But… it says unisex. Like right there. Not “male”.



afro-dominicano:

Brain Scans Link Concern for Justice With Reason, Not Emotion

People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion. That is the unexpected finding of new brain scan research from the University of Chicago department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.
Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice — for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly, or with mercy. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”
“We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.
Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.
As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.
But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.
The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.
Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.
“Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.
UChicago Psychology doctoral student Keith Yoder is a co-author on the paper, which was published in the March 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.


I’ve gotta assume that picture is an accident and they aren’t comparing themselves to the suffragette movement. 

afro-dominicano:

Brain Scans Link Concern for Justice With Reason, Not Emotion

People who care about justice are swayed more by reason than emotion. That is the unexpected finding of new brain scan research from the University of Chicago department of Psychology and Center for Cognitive and Social Neuroscience.

Psychologists have found that some individuals react more strongly than others to situations that invoke a sense of justice — for example, seeing a person being treated unfairly, or with mercy. The new study used brain scans to analyze the thought processes of people with high “justice sensitivity.”

“We were interested to examine how individual differences about justice and fairness are represented in the brain to better understand the contribution of emotion and cognition in moral judgment,” explained lead author Jean Decety, the Irving B. Harris Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry.

Using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) brain-scanning device, the team studied what happened in the participants’ brains as they judged videos depicting behavior that was morally good or bad. For example, they saw a person put money in a beggar’s cup or kick the beggar’s cup away. The participants were asked to rate on a scale how much they would blame or praise the actor seen in the video. People in the study also completed questionnaires that assessed cognitive and emotional empathy, as well as their justice sensitivity.

As expected, study participants who scored high on the justice sensitivity questionnaire assigned significantly more blame when they were evaluating scenes of harm, Decety said. They also registered more praise for scenes showing a person helping another individual.

But the brain imaging also yielded surprises. During the behavior-evaluation exercise, people with high justice sensitivity showed more activity than average participants in parts of the brain associated with higher-order cognition. Brain areas commonly linked with emotional processing were not affected.

The conclusion was clear, Decety said: “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven. Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

According to Decety, one implication is that the search for justice and the moral missions of human rights organizations and others do not come primarily from sentimental motivations, as they are often portrayed. Instead, that drive may have more to do with sophisticated analysis and mental calculation.

Decety adds that evaluating good actions elicited relatively high activity in the region of the brain involved in decision-making, motivation and rewards. This finding suggests that perhaps individuals make judgments about behavior based on how they process the reward value of good actions as compared to bad actions.

“Our results provide some of the first evidence for the role of justice sensitivity in enhancing neural processing of moral information in specific components of the brain network involved in moral judgment,” Decety said.

UChicago Psychology doctoral student Keith Yoder is a co-author on the paper, which was published in the March 19 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

I’ve gotta assume that picture is an accident and they aren’t comparing themselves to the suffragette movement. 

(via thisisthinprivilege)


nonsolokawaii:

Booboo and her friends =^_^= | via

(via adorabolin)


tomwaitsvisualdictionary:

Tom Waits’ groundbreaking rotoscope film, “Tom Waits For No One,” to be restored for its 35th anniversary. The filmmakers are raising money on Kickstarter. Check it out!

fuck. yes.


TL;DR Operating on obese patients is dangerous

Copied from a Reddit post 

Doctor here, specifically I’m an anaesthetist. I thought I would share a bit of info about how obesity and being overweight impact on my ability to get these patients through surgery safely.

Obese patients are the bane of my life. In every way they are more difficult to anaesthetise and operate on. They have more problems while being put to sleep, during the surgery and in recovery afterwards. I’m going to explain exactly why these patients are more difficult to manage.

Before a patient comes for an elective surgery they are seen by either an anaesthetist or a specially trained nurse to assess their risk of having problems. When an obese patient walks in I internally start to get jumpy. I always treat patients with respect and kindness. They are often very worried about surgery. I have to explain to obese patients that they have a much higher risk of complications, which understandably they don’t take well. I have had to sit through some serious fat logic at times. I’ll share some specific stories if people would like. My colleagues and I then have to make the difficult decision on whether these guys are fit for surgery. It’s not an easy call a lot of the time, especially when the surgery is something they have been waiting a long time for or is for something that is having a big impact on their lives. We want to do our best for people and get them to their surgery if at all possible. It’s heart breaking for me when I have to tell a patient they can’t have their surgery as it would be too risky and that they can try to lose weight and come back in 6 months.

Once the patients actually get to the operating theatre the real problems start. If the patient is particularly heavy we need to get swap the ordinary operating table out for a more robust version. We need to divert extra staff from other areas to help with moving and positioning the patient.

The first problem we often come across is inserting an IV line. It’s simply very difficult to find veins when they are buried under inches of fat. I remember one occasion when I had to actually cancel and reschedule an operation because my self and two senior consultant anaesthetists could simply not get venous access after literally dozens of attempts. When you give the patients the ‘sleepy’ drugs you then have to manage the patients airway and breath for them. You have to hold the patient’s airway open and with the large heavy necks that these patients have this can be physically very difficult. Intubating these patients is much more difficult. The weight of the extra tissue in their necks means their airways collapse (the same reason they get sleep apnoea) and you can’t see the opening of the trachea to insert the tube. This is obviously dangerous for the patient. We have to use difficult airway equipment far more often.

Obese patients are much harder to ventilate due to the heavy weight of their chests. We have to use high pressures to force their lungs open. This can damage their lungs and slow their recovery. It also really increases the chance of them having breathing trouble when they wake up.

Undergoing a general anaesthetic and operation puts strain on the hearts of the healthiest patients. Obviously in the obese patient they have a much higher risk of heart and artery problems to begin with. They have a much higher risk of having a heart attack while asleep than a patient of normal size. They may also be unable to sustain their blood pressure while anaesthetised and need a bucket load of extra heart stimulating drugs to keep them ticking over. Simple things like taking the patients blood pressure are more difficult as a) the cuffs may not fit properly round their arms and b) the readings are less accurate anyway as they are being measured through a thick layer of fat.

Diabetes is another major problem. I’m responsible for their blood sugar during surgery and the stress of being operated on throws their sugars up the left. This can be really dangerous and it’s just another thing I have to keep on top of that I wouldn’t normally have to even consider.

The risks of an anaesthetic increase with the length of the surgery. Operations last longer in an obese patient due to all the extra tissue the surgeon has to wade through and then stitch up.

Obese patients are at a much higher risk of having a blood clot. A DVT is more likely during surgery due to the patient lying still for an extended period and the stress hormone overdrive. A clot can be fatal if it moves to the lungs. We have to load the patients up with more anti clotting drugs which makes the risk of bleeding post op more likely.

All in all it’s a complete nightmare. We always do our best but our jobs are so much harder when dealing with obese patients. I’m worried the entire time and it is not rare for things to go badly wrong. I know if I were overweight and needed surgery id be even more terrified than I would be normally.”



cadysamuels:

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imageThis show received 42 emmy nominations.

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